HOME    ABOUT US   BLOG   CONTACT   LUNCH   MEDIA   SUPPORT   EVENTS   POSTSECONDARY

It takes a village to raise a child. Here at the Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy, parents, students, volunteers, administrators and teachers all come together to make the academy the best it can be.

The three chefs are dedicated to their students. Click here to find out who they are and know about their rich professional backgrounds.

The Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy Foundation Inc. exists solely to promote and support The Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy.

Students

Chefs

Boosters

"We teach culinary excellence"

JACOBSON CULINARY ARTS ACADEMY IS AN ACADEMY OF DISTINCTION

At high school culinary academies, students serve Grade A lunches

By Laura Reiley, Tampa Bay Times Food Critic

In Print: Thursday, November 1, 2012

The luscious chocolate pot de creme alone could have been priced at $9, the amount I paid for a three-course lunch, including beverage and housemade challah bread, at the gorgeous facility set apart slightly from Tarpon Springs High School. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Since 2009, at the end of September or beginning of October a line starts forming at noon on Thursdays. That’s the day Jacobson opens its restaurant, fashioned like a mini Outback, to the public. READ MORE........

Stars in the baking: Jacobson Culinary Academy students compete for elite teams

By Janet K. Keeler, Tampa Bay Times Food and Travel Editor

In Print: Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Senior Jyaira Moore had some unusual things in her backpack one morning last week when she boarded the school bus. • Nestled among the notebooks and pens were small bags and packages of shrimp, uncooked rice, spicy sausage, corn kernels, parsley and seasonings, plus ice packs to keep the perishables cold. There were three blue-tinted, stemmed glasses, carefully wrapped so they wouldn’t break on the commute to Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy at Tarpon Springs High School. • The ice packs were especially important because Moore catches the bus at 5:05 a.m. in St. Petersburg for the nearly two-hour ride to school. The backpack’s contents were destined for a very important dish. On this day, she was one of nearly 80 students competing for about 25 spots on the school’s competitive culinary teams.

Moore’s spicy shrimp and sausage rice entree — she never settled on a name — arranged artfully in the blue glasses impressed the judges as much as her work habits and personal presentation. She looked professional in her chef’s coat, following the rules for no fingernail polish and no dangling earrings. Click here to read more.